12619899803_57e6e6a77b_b-Ferguson

Spirits of the Wild

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“Refreshing portraits of nature as seen by other people in the past.”

-Publishers Weekly

Spirits of the Wild: The World’s Great Nature Myths
The World's Great Nature Myths: Spirits of the Wild

1996/Falcon Publishing, 2000
hardcover

 

From one of the world’s best-loved nature writers comes an enchantingly written, inspiring, and beautifully illustrated collection of 60 nature myths from many culture, including Greece, Africa, Sweden, New Zealand, and the American Southwest. Woodcuts throughout.

Excerpt

Children Learn To Walk

Ojibwa Indians, North-central United States And Canada

The wise hero of this story is Nanabush, one of four sons of the West Wind. Each of these sons was charged with bringing special gifts to the Ojibwa people—courage, romance, a sense of beauty, and for Nanabush, humor and storytelling.

It was a long time ago in the land of trees, and Spirit Woman had given birth to human twins. Every animal was fond of these twins, forever doting on them, each eager to do whatever was needed to make them warm and safe and happy. Dog, for one, never left their side. Sometimes flies would come and pester the children, and Dog would snap at them to make them fly away. To amuse the children, he nuzzled their soft bellies with his nose or jumped into the air and did all manner of wonderful tricks. When the twins were hungry, Wolf and Deer lent their milk, while Bear warmed them with his marvelous coat of fur. The birds sang them to sleep at night, and Beaver washed them in the lake.

Synopsis

These are the stories of five thousand years of men and women celebrating nature …

Here are sixty of the world’s most intriguing nature myths. From Greece to Africa to the American Southwest, each is a bite-sized chronicle of how people spun relationships to the world around them – to the landscape and the heavens, to the creatures that moved through their daily lives. These are the stories of five thousand years of men and women celebrating nature—celebrations that can still spark and catch fire in anyone longing for place.

Synopsis

“Refreshing portraits of nature as seen by other people in the past.”
—Publishers Weekly

“A raft of fabulous stories … provocative creation myths from all corners of the globe.”
—Kirkus Reviews

Voted one of the best books of 1996 by the New York City Public Library.